Christmas Pudding Recipe

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This Christmas pudding recipe is fun, packed full of festive flavour, and so easy to make. It really is the perfect ending to a day of feasting.

Christmas Pudding Recipe

I'll be the first to admit that fruitcakes were never my thing. Maybe it's because the only fruitcakes I ever tried as a child were heavy, dense and rock solid. But then I discovered this Christmas pudding recipe, and I have been converted! The steaming method of cooking produces a most deliciously moist and delicately fluffy texture - it really is very good!

Christmas Pudding Recipe

Like many traditional foods, the very first, porridge-like, versions of Christmas pudding bears little resemblance to what we eat today. Thanks to the Victorians, Christmas pudding has become the sweet desert we now know it to be. Some traditional recipes included meat, such as beef or mutton, and many Christmas puddings today still include suet in their recipe. However, this vegetarian friendly Christmas pudding recipe uses butter, or you can use vegetable suet if you can find it where you are.

Christmas Pudding Recipe

One of the great things about Christmas pudding is that it can be made well in advance and left for the flavours to develop. Traditionally, this was done on the last Sunday before the Advent, which became known as 'Stir Up Sunday,' when family members would take turns stirring the Christmas pudding recipe ingredients. But you can make yours the week before Christmas, if you like - it means one less thing to worry about as you're busy preparing and assembling the Christmas Day feast!

Christmas Pudding Recipe

This Christmas pudding recipe is certainly good enough to eat on its own, but you may wish to light it with some brandy or your favourite spirit to add some dramatic flair (and flavouring, of course). Nothing is quite so impressive as a flaming pudding - it's the perfect way to wow your guests. And although it's called Christmas pudding, there's really no reason why you can't enjoy it throughout the festive season - simply make up a few puddings in advance to store in your cupboard for when the craving strikes!

Christmas Pudding Recipe

Here's what you'll need for this Christmas pudding recipe:
(Click here to jump straight to the recipe)

50g raisins
50g dried currants
25g dried cranberries
25g dried apricots, chopped
60ml Pedro Ximenez sherry (or your choice of flavoured liqueur - orange liqueur also works great)
30g plain flour
25g panko breadcrumbs (or 40g fresh breadcrumbs)
15g ground almonds
50g butter, frozen and grated (or 35g shredded vegetable suet)
50g dark muscovado (brown) sugar
1/4 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
pinch of ground cloves
1/4 lemon, zest and juice
1 small orange (e.g. tangerine or clementine), zest and juice
1 large egg
1/4 Bramley (or Granny Smith) apple, peeled and grated
40ml brandy, to flame (optional)

You'll also need a 1 pint (500ml) plastic pudding basin with lid or other similar pudding mould.

And here's what you'll need to do:

  • In advance (at least one day) of making the pudding, combine the dried fruit and sherry together in a bowl, cover and leave it to rest at room temperature. I usually leave mine for a few days until most of the sherry is absorbed and the fruits are plump.
  • You can also prepare the butter in advance by first freezing the amount you need, then grate it and return it to the freezer for storage until needed.
  • When you're ready to make the pudding, grease the pudding basin and lid, and set it aside.
  • Put all the remaining ingredients, apart from the brandy and butter, into a mixing bowl.
  • Using a wooden spoon, mix together until combined.
  • Add the sherry soaked fruit to the mixture, including any excess sherry remaining in the bowl. Stir together, then add the frozen grated butter, stirring again to combine.
  • Transfer the mixture to the greased pudding basin, squashing the mixture down as you go, so that it is nicely compact, and the top is level.
  • Put the lid on the basin, and wrap the top with a sheet of aluminium foil, pleated down the centre to allow for expansion. Secure the foil to the basin with an elastic band.
  • Place a steaming rack at the bottom of a large lidded pot, and then place the pudding basin on top.
  • Boil some water in a kettle, and add it to the pot to come about halfway up the basin.
  • Close the lid of the pot, and steam the pudding for two hours, checking now and again to make sure the water hasn't boiled dry. If you need to top up the water, always used boiling water.
  • When done, uncover the pot, and let the pudding rest for a few minutes until cool enough to handle. Carefully remove it from the pot, remove the elastic band and foil, and let it cool to room temperature. Store it somewhere safe until Christmas Day, or whenever you're ready to eat it.

To serve:

  • On the day of eating, rewrap the top with foil and an elastic band, as before.
  • Steam, as before, for one hour, and when it has cooled sufficiently but is still warm, turn it upside down onto a serving plate.
  • If you'd like to flame your pudding, warm some brandy in a small saucepan, and light it with a kitchen match. Carry it VERY CAREFULLY to the pudding, and pour or ladle over for a dramatic effect that will wow your guests.
  • If flaming puddings isn't your thing, simply garnish yours with a sprig of holly and serve.
Lighting a Christmas Pudding
Christmas Pudding

Christmas Pudding Recipe

By

Christmas Pudding Recipe

Try this Christmas pudding recipe for a simple yet delicious festive bake.

Prep Time: 20 minutes plus soaking time
Cook time: 2 hours plus steam time before serving
Yield: 1 pint (500ml) pudding
Course: Main, Pasta
Cuisine: Pudding, Dessert, Snack
Tags: Christmas, Cake

Ingredients

50g raisins
50g dried currants
25g dried cranberries
25g dried apricots, chopped
60ml Pedro Ximenez sherry (or your choice of flavoured liqueur - orange liqueur also works great)
30g plain flour
25g panko breadcrumbs (or 40g fresh breadcrumbs)
15g ground almonds
50g butter, frozen and grated (or 35g shredded vegetable suet)
50g dark muscovado (brown) sugar
1/4 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Pinch of ground cloves
1/4 lemon, zest and juice
1 small orange (e.g. tangerine or clementine), zest and juice
1 large egg
1/4 Bramley (or Granny Smith) apple, peeled and grated
40ml brandy, to flame (optional)

You'll also need a 1 pint (500ml) plastic pudding basin with lid or other similar pudding mould.

Method

  1. In advance (at least one day) of making the pudding, combine the dried fruit and sherry together in a bowl, cover and leave it to rest at room temperature. I usually leave mine for a few days until most of the sherry is absorbed and the fruits are plump.
  2. You can also prepare the butter in advance by first freezing the amount you need, then grate it and return it to the freezer for storage until needed.
  3. When you're ready to make the pudding, grease the pudding basin and lid, and set it aside.
  4. Put all the remaining ingredients, apart from the brandy and butter, into a mixing bowl.
  5. Using a wooden spoon, mix together until combined.
  6. Add the sherry soaked fruit to the mixture, including any excess sherry remaining in the bowl. Stir together, then add the frozen grated butter, stirring again to combine.
  7. Transfer the mixture to the greased pudding basin, squashing the mixture down as you go, so that it is nicely compact, and the top is level.
  8. Put the lid on the basin, and wrap the top with a sheet of aluminium foil, pleated down the centre to allow for expansion. Secure the foil to the basin with an elastic band.
  9. Place a steaming rack at the bottom of a large lidded pot, and then place the pudding basin on top.
  10. Boil some water in a kettle, and add it to the pot to come about halfway up the basin.
  11. Close the lid of the pot, and steam the pudding for two hours, checking now and again to make sure the water hasn't boiled dry. If you need to top up the water, always used boiling water.
  12. When done, uncover the pot, and let the pudding rest for a few minutes until cool enough to handle. Carefully remove it from the pot, remove the elastic band and foil, and let it cool to room temperature. Store it somewhere safe until Christmas Day, or whenever you're ready to eat it.

To serve:

  1. On the day of eating, rewrap the top with foil and an elastic band, as before.
  2. Steam, as before, for one hour, and when it has cooled sufficiently but is still warm, turn it upside down onto a serving plate.
  3. If you'd like to flame your pudding, warm some brandy in a small saucepan, and light it with a kitchen match. Carry it VERY CAREFULLY to the pudding, and pour or ladle over for a dramatic effect that will wow your guests.
  4. If flaming puddings isn't your thing, simply garnish yours with a sprig of holly and serve.

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